Free Comic Book Day and the Comic Book Writer

Some of you know, but many of you don’t, that this Saturday is Free Comic Book Day in comic specialty shops all across the US. This year will be the 10th Annual Free Comic Book Day. What an incredible opportunity for budding comic writers to browse a list of potential “reference” books and come away with one for free! It’s also a great opportunity to meet local and nationally recognized creators as many of them (including myself! More on that below) will be making appearances at comic shops nationwide.

Comic writers will always be asked the question “do you draw, too?” Most comic writers who’ve been around long enough are used to the question and can roll with it. In fact, comic writers should anticipate this question because comic books are such a visual medium.

So what does a comic writer do?

While there are a multitude of variations, there are two basic styles of scripts used in comic books/graphic novels: full script and plot first. Long time comic book readers have likely heard them called “Marvel style” and “DC style” for the simple reason that long ago each company used a different style of scripts. Those styles are more interchangeable today, but some old-timers hang on to those terms.

A full script or DC style script is a finished script and once it is accepted by the editor, the writer is done. A full script contains a detailed panel description for each comic panel (the individual pictures on each page) in the entire comic. Some writers provide very basic art descriptions; some provide camera direction; and some provide very detailed descriptions of every tiny thing in the panel. Not only does the writer of a full script have to provide art direction, but he must include all of the text that the reader will see or read. This includes captions, thought bubbles and dialogue balloons.

A plot first or Marvel style script is done by the writer in two stages. The first stage is a plot only. The writer provides a detailed description of the actions happening on each page. Setting, mood, etc. is also covered, but very little—if any—dialogue is included. Writers will often suggest what the dialogue or thoughts will be simply to give the artist some direction in facial expressions and reactions. The artist then takes this plot and creates the visual, determining how many panels, etc. The finished art then goes back to the writer so that he can add in the captions, dialogue and thoughts, using the same plot that he provided to the editor and artist.

Obviously there are pros and cons to each style, but both work and proven successful over time. Regardless of style, a writer still must be prepared to tell a good story.

So, for all of you in the Jackson/Pearl/Brandon/Reservoir area, come out to Heroes and Dreams in Flowood this Saturday and pick up a free comic from the boys there! Hours are from 10am until 8pm. While you’re there, say hi to me and pick up my book, not one of the free ones—sorry. I will sign it for free, though! I’ll have to leave before 8 to get home—so come early! J

To find a comic shop near you participating in Free Comic Book Day, click here.

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1 Comment

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One response to “Free Comic Book Day and the Comic Book Writer

  1. Pingback: Free Comic Book Day 2015 | Roland Mann's Ramblin' Weblog

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